About love, but not about love that produces blindness to poultry…

What do you mean ?

I think it’s not an exaggeration when I say that each of us has not learned what love is, participating in personal development courses, philosophy, or reading about it. Taking me as an example, I swear :), that no book or philosophical work has been of any use to me and has not increased my understanding of the paradisal phenomenon, or of the emotion that can get you encompassed when you hear of love.
I’m sure I’m lucky, 🙂 I didn’t waste my time with the futility of reading about love, but learning (again with some luck) 🙂 from experience with loving people, (in love with “blooming”) what love is.
But not about my experiences, which (seriously and entirely I have dedicated myself to the bone marrow) I want to talk, merely about the boundaries of love.
The question that it’s often asked is: Does love have limits?
Yes, it…

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About Expectations and Labels, or “The Pygmalion Effect” …

What do you mean ?

A sophisticated name for one of the most common mistakes in today’s society. The “Pygmalion Effect” implies the phenomenon that the higher our expectations of a person, the better his /her performance will get. It is based on a test (Rosenthal & Jakobson 1968), a powerful type of self-fulfilled prophecy, in a classic experiment about teachers´ expectations, a simple experiment in which students received a standard intelligence test. At the end of the test, the teachers received a list of five students who were supposed to have obtained unusually high IQ scores, and that were expected to become “class sprinters”.In reality, however, the five children were randomly chosen.By the end of the year, all children won in IQ, but the five “elected” won much more than the other students. Obviously, the teachers treated them differently, after they were told, to expect a sudden improvement in performances of the five elected…

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The “Gordian Knot”

The “Gordian Knot” or “Gordius’s knot” is “the symbol of a confusion for which conventional means are insufficient.” (DEX)”
Gordius, the Frigian plowman, was named king in his country. As a gratitude, he worshiped the “carriage” with which he had arrived in the Great Phrygia, to the god Jupiter, and exposed it to the Acropolis of Gordium. He binds the yoke to the drawbar, after that he makes an “unopened knot”, waiting to see if prophecy will be accomplished: That man who will succeed in undoing the knot will conquer Asia.
Alexander the Great, arrives in Phrygia and wants to untie the knot. He quickly realizes he will not be able to untie it, except by cutting with his sword. He will motivate his choice:
“It does not matter how this knot unfolds!”
Alexander’s solution to the problem led to the saying, “cutting the Gordian knot,” which means solving a complicated problem through bold action.
So if there is a Gordian Knot in your life, and conventional methods no longer help, you’re stuck in a situation, you have just one solution: Cut it!… and then carry on…, life is too short and there are no guarantees!

Where to hide these days?

Where to hide these days? In what recession of memory? It is certainly a comfortable one, in which nothing has changed. But by now it is already the memory of a memory and so far the road is a twisted clew of synapses. Childhood is the safest destination, but it’s getting harder and harder for me to get there.

“Even the smallest flower has its roots in infinity.” It’s a phrase from a book I recently just opened (Das Sanduhrbuch by Ernst Jünger). If I remember correctly, so said Borges, that you can read the history of the entire Universe in the spots of a leopard.

I do not know what others believe, but when I think of this idea, although magnificent, it seems very tiring. Most likely, it is the fatigue that made me think that in a way, what makes us people special, is our freshness. None of us are ancient. Yes, we have the same  eons in the back, but this is of little interest to us. The unconscious, yes, is ancient. But consciousness is new. It suddenly appears, at one point, and disappears just as suddenly, after only a few decades. Decades, not millennia, not millions, not billions of years. We have no time to get tired, to get old, to stiffen. And we are our consciences and nothing else. Everything else is repeatable, every feature, every eye color, every shade of hair, every trace of temperament, every gesture, every word, every whim, all of this is found in many people. But consciousness is always unique and very lonely, unfortunately! It’s good that we have empathy from time to time, so at least we suspect that there are other consciences around us, and luckily we stay young. I suspect that Jünger’s flower is unconscious. Otherwise I can not explain how it supports the boundlessness of its roots.

Painting by Vladimir-Kush